2003 Annual Design Review Equipment Design Distinction

PHILIPS MR PANORAMA RANGE .23T, .6T, 1.0T

The Philips Design Team in Eindhoven, Netherlands, reengineered the traditional MRI machine to relieve patients’ anxiety about the procedure and quell any claustrophobic tendencies. Designers discarded the original tunnel shape in favor of a large 360-degree panoramic opening with wide, mobile beds that make for easier entrance and exit in case of emergencies. The team also added pillow-like shapes and warm colors for a softer, less intimidating aesthetic. Wiklund, however, argued that while the machine wasn’t scary-looking, it didn’t necessarily look comfortable either. Amit countered, “It’s hard not to appreciate the amount of work. There’s a strong and unique form statement here.”

CLIENT Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands
DESIGN Philips Design Team, Eindhoven, Netherlands: Stefano Marzano, CEO and chief creative director
MATERIALS | FABRICATION Reaction injection molding, glass-reinforced plastic, steel sheet ending and welding, aluminum sand casting
SOFTWARE Adobe Illustrator, Flamingo, Rhinoceros 3D

PHILIPS MULTIDIAGNOST ELEVA X-RAY SYSTEM

“The MRI is revolutionary. This is evolutionary,” Amit said of the Eindhoven, Netherlands-based Philips Design Team’s all-digital x-ray system for making real-time moving images. Although Wiklund thought the interface had a “cluttered look,” he admired the level of integration of hardware and software. “Taking into account how much had to be resolved, this is an amazingly complex machine,” he said. The system has a Direct Access Module, which contains an operating console and monitor for administrative functions, and a Geo-Imaging Module that controls geometric movement. Additionally, a C-arc design and height-adjustable table offer flexibility and patient comfort. “It would actually be a challenge to snag your clothing on this unit,” Wiklund observed. “It looks like someone said, ‘We won’t ship unless there’s no way to snag.'”

CLIENT Philips Medical Systems, Best, Netherlands
DESIGN Philips Design Team, Eindhoven, Netherlands: Stefano Marzano, CEO and chief creative director
MATERIALS | FABRICATION Reaction injection molding, glass-reinforced plastic, steel sheet ending and welding, aluminum sand casting
SOFTWARE Adobe Illustrator, Flamingo, Rhinoceros 3D

MICRIMAGE READER

“It’s truly biomorphic,” Michael Wiklund said of the MICRImage check and credit card reader from Carson, Calif.-based Magtek. “It has an abdominal look, like muscles or tendons, as if you could put your finger there and feel a pulse.” Designers at Patton Design in Irvine, Calif., created soft contours and lines for cashiers’ comfort. A curved silver lip provides intuitive entry for checks, and the credit card slot is angled down to accommodate natural movement. “It’s abstract and alien,” Gadi Amit said, “yet it keeps a balance.”

CLIENT Magtek, Carson, Calif.: Lou Struett, principal
DESIGN Patton Design, Irvine, Calif.: Doug Patton, design director; Chris Anzalone, industrial designer; Jeff Thompson and Hamid Safir, model makers
MATERIALS | FABRICATION Injection-molded ABS outside housing, internal stamped-metal housing to which PCB and scanners are mounted
SOFTWARE Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, ProEngineer, 3D StudioMax

NAVIGATOR PRESENTATION REMOTE

Although Amit said he had some problems with the wireless remote control’s directionality, Wiklund stated, “I don’t care what it does, I want one.” Designed by Patton Design in Irvine, Calif., for Interlink Electronics, the Navigator Presentation Remote uses tactile icons to help users operate computer displays and LCD projectors in the dark. The designers limited the display to four simple buttons: two “reverse” and “forward” arrows, a cluster of dots forming the Braille letter “I” for “information” and a red laser pointer button. “It’s retro in a way that’s good,” Wiklund said. “It’s reminiscent of a product from the ’60s-a ham radio or an electric shaver.”

CLIENT Interlink Electronics, Camarillo, Calif.: Mike Ambrose, principal
DESIGN Patton Design, Irvine, Calif.: Doug Patton, design director; Ryan Redanbaugh, industrial designer; John Murtaugh, mechanical engineer; Jeff Thompson and Hamid Safir, model makers
MATERIALS | FABRICATION Stamped aluminum, injection-molded plastic, rubberized paint
SOFTWARE Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, Solidworks, 3D Studio Max

Design Distinction : FC4000 SERIES LIFT TRUCK

Wiklund hailed this electric-powered lift truck as “the Ferrari of forklifts,” while Amit noted, “There’s an amazing attention to detail: the look of the back end, the integration of bumpers into the form, the armrests and the padding at the feet. It’s beautifully designed without compromising functionality.” Designers at Crown Equipment Corp. in New Bremen, Ohio, focused on an “operator forward” design that gives drivers more head and knee room, wider shoulder clearance and better visibility. An off-center steering wheel allows controlled, one-handed operation. “It probably adds an element of satisfaction to a job that’s repetitive,” Wiklund said.

CLIENT | DESIGN Crown Equipment Corp., New Bremen, Ohio: Baron Brandt, Jim Kraimer, Mike Hemry, Jeff Burger, Leif Norland, Peter Bartlett and Doug Goodner, design team
SOFTWARE Adobe Photoshop, Ashlar-Vellum, Freehand, Unigraphics

ARGUS3 THERMAL IMAGING CAMERA

Both jurors noted the fine detailing of this rescue tool used by firefighters to locate people through smoke and darkness. Designers at Alloy in Farnham, England, created the thermal-imaging camera for E2V Technologies of Chelmsford, England, to fit easily into a gloved hand and hang close to the chest or hip so as not to impede movement. Handles on both sides make for easy passing, and the electronic internal chassis can survive a 1,000-degree C. flame test. The camera features image zoom, image capture and the ability to send live footage to outside command posts. Wiklund especially appreciated its functionality, explaining, “What we’re judging is the ability of someone to pick it up, use it and otherwise forget about it because they’re under great stress.” Both jurors thought the use of color was simple, bold and appropriate. “This is a very harsh environment, yet still someone took the time to choose a good color and smooth lines,” Amit remarked.

CLIENT E2V Technologies, Chelmsford, England: Bhavesh Mistry, project manager; Barry Macdonald, mechanical; Bill Wilson, Gordon Haddow, Bill Harper and Kevin Godwin, electronics; Gary Collins and David Brand, software
DESIGN Alloy, Farnham, England: James Lamb, director; Mathew Plested and Andrew Barker, designers
MATERIALS | FABRICATION Radel 5100 polyphenylsulfone, Evoprene H616, NC machined acrylic with EMC coating, silicon rubber
SOFTWARE Unigraphics v16.0.1

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