Elwood in the Third Dimension

 
Elwood H. Smith, the cartoonist, has been working on Mondo Luigi, a 3D animated film about a mouse named Wendell (above) and a cat named Luigi (below). Seeing Smith’s spirited characters brought to life in this dimensional way is a treat that should not be missed. So to see the work in progress (co-authored with Claudio Marzollo and animated by Brian Hoard) visit here for clips and other visuals. There is also a feedback mechanism here. And for more of his 2D animations click here.
 

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Daily Heller, Imprint: Print Magazine's Design Blog

About Steven Heller

Steven Heller is the co-chair of the SVA MFA Designer /Designer as Author + Entrepreneur program, writes frequently for Wired and Design Observer. He is also the author of over 170 books on design and visual culture. He received the 1999 AIGA Medal and is the 2011 recipient of the Smithsonian National Design Award.

3 thoughts on “Elwood in the Third Dimension

  1. BluegrassKev

    This makes me sad. I feel like I’m watching someone “jump the shark.”
    Smith has been one of my favorite illustrators for over twenty years. But to me, the beauty of his work is found in the whimsical hand-drawn, hand-painted character creations.
    This attempt to digitally replicate these types of characters comes off as cold and mechanized. They are overly slick-looking and the animation is clunky.
    In my thinking, traditional stop-motion animation or ‘claymation’ would have been more consistent with Smith’s neo-retro style.
    While accepting the fact that Mr. Smith can do whatever he chooses, I have to say I miss the warmth of his previous work.

  2. BluegrassKev

    This makes me sad. I feel like I’m watching someone “jump the shark.”
    Smith has been one of my favorite illustrators for over twenty years. But to me, the beauty of his work is found in the whimsical hand-drawn, hand-painted character creations.
    This attempt to digitally replicate these types of characters comes off as cold and mechanized. They are overly slick-looking and the animation is clunky.
    In my thinking, traditional stop-motion animation or ‘claymation’ would have been more consistent with Smith’s neo-retro style.
    While accepting the fact that Mr. Smith can do whatever he chooses, I have to say I miss the warmth of his previous work.

  3. BluegrassKev

    This makes me sad. I feel like I’m watching someone “jump the shark.”
    Smith has been one of my favorite illustrators for over twenty years. But to me, the beauty of his work is found in the whimsical hand-drawn, hand-painted character creations.
    This attempt to digitally replicate these types of characters comes off as cold and mechanized. They are overly slick-looking and the animation is clunky.
    In my thinking, traditional stop-motion animation or ‘claymation’ would have been more consistent with Smith’s neo-retro style.
    While accepting the fact that Mr. Smith can do whatever he chooses, I have to say I miss the warmth of his previous work.

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