Author Archives: Buzz Poole

About Buzz Poole

Buzz Poole has written about design, books, and culture for numerous outlets, including Lit Hub and Playboy. He is the author of Workingman's Dead, published as part of the 33 1/3 series, and the co-author of Camera Crazy. Keep up with him @buzzpoole.

The Graphic Canon: An Anthology to Read and Look At

In his introduction to the middle volume in the planned three-part The Graphic Canon (out this month from Seven Stories Press), the series’ editor, Russ Kick, writes, “Classic literature is more exciting, relevant, and subversive than it generally gets credit.” Agreed. If people really believed that great literature was irrelevant, books wouldn’t still be banned from schools...

"We Hate Everything": A Visual History of Punk

“A Punk Etymology,” slipped into the back of Punk: An Aesthetic, informs readers that Shakespeare used the word in Measure for Measure—“My lord, she may be a punk, for many of them are neither maid, widow, nor wife.” That was in 1623; the Bard also penned it into The Merry Wives of Windsor more...

Designing Your Vote

I know all you Imprint readers are hawkeyed visual people. I trust you are equally politically attuned, no matter your party affiliation. And in this age of the 24-hour media cycle, who needs reminding that it is an election year, what with the deafening, partisan echo chambers of talking points, stump speeches, and gaffes?...

What Do You See?

News of Cecilia Gimenez’s “restoration” of an ecce homo fresco in a Catholic church in Borja, Spain, has been making the media rounds. Ecce homo (“behold the man”) is its own genre that depicts Jesus before the crucifixion, often wearing a crown of thorns. As the image below demonstrates, Gimenez took some creative liberties...

Letterpress Adventures with Moveable Type's Kyle Durrie

Kyle Durrie is the proprietor of the letterpress studio Power and Light Press. I first met her in 2009 at the Renegade Craft Fair in Brooklyn, where she was sharing a table with my good friend Brandon Mise, of Blue Barnhouse fame. In 2007, Durrie’s apprenticeship with Blue Barhnouse turned into a job, which...

Seeing the Olympics from a Different Perspective

As Londoner Gareth Hague commented in this space in early July, the pomp and national pride that usually marches in during every Olympic cycle has been supplanted by ridicule, aggravation, and protest, thanks to an Olympics that is, as the New Statesman put it, “suffocated by sponsors.” The angst that the denizens of London...

The End of Print (Again): Why David Carson Still Matters

David Carson came to the fore of visual culture in the early 1990s, solidifying his place in 1995 with the publication of The End of Print: The Grafik Design of David Carson. His frenetic lettering and layouts inspired countless designers to push boundaries and break classical rules, qualities that are still prized today. So...

The Value of Childish Things

Like most book lovers, I have fond memories of being read to as a child, hearing and seeing a story unfold with the turn of each page. Dr Seuss’s rhyming whimsy, Maurice Sendak’s respect for irreverence, the foodtastic excitement of Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs—these books made impressions on me. But I really...

First Words: Designers Take on Page One of Great Expectations

“My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip.” Those lines may not be as recognizable as “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” but they are nevertheless part of the literary canon,...

Let There Be Neon

True story: my first trip to Europe, a summer backpacking adventure with some college friends, all guys. We met in Paris, explored, ate, drank. One was vociferous about visiting a strip club, but much to his disappointment, it never happened. Not too long after Paris, we were in Madrid. We didn’t know about the...