Author Archives: Buzz Poole

About Buzz Poole

Buzz Poole has written about books, design, art, and culture for numerous outlets, including Print, The Village Voice, The Believer, Los Angeles Review of Books, San Francisco Chronicle, and The Millions. He is the author of the story collection I Like to Keep My Troubles on the Windy Side of Things; the New Statesman named his examination of unexpected iconography, Madonna of the Toast, one of 2007’s Best Underground Books.

2012 New Visual Artist: Kelsey Dake

Kelsey Dake doesn’t like to submit sketches, prefers conceptual assignments to literal ones, is bored by long deadlines, and loves same-day turnarounds. Her talent is apparent, but her impatience has served her well as a young illustrator. She moved to New York after graduating in 2010 from the Art Center College of Design, in...

100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design

You are reading this, which means that you don’t need me, or anyone else for that matter, to explain to you Steven Heller’s encyclopedic knowledge of graphic design and visual communication. He has partnered with the art director and writer Veronique Vienne, compiling the new book 100 Ideas That Changed Graphic Design. The title...

2012 New Visual Artist: Berton Hasebe

New typefaces emerge every day, but not many of them are notable; few qualify as genuinely innovative. But Alda, Berton Hasebe’s graduation project at the Royal Academy of Art, The Hague, broke new ground. Rather than treat different weights traditionally by adjusting the thickness of characters relative to their heights, Alda differentiates among its...

Dubai Graphic Encyclopedia

When, oh when will someone invite me to Dubai? I’ve read about it, watched reports and talked to plenty of people who have spent time there. It’s a long flight from New York and unless someone was to send me, I’m not sure I’d ever choose just to go. Perhaps if I had a...

Back to the Underground

On the copyright page of We Own the Night: The Art of the Underbelly Project, curators Workhorse and PAC include on their thank you list “all the people who know how to keep a secret and keep their mouths shut!” I’m one of these people, having been shown an early proposal for the book...

Accurate Maps vs. Useful Maps

I’ve got maps on my mind again, having recently found W.W. Jervis’s The World in Maps: A Study in Map Evolution, published by Oxford University Press in 1937. I discovered this book quite unexpectedly one recent afternoon, running errands in my Queens neighborhood. New York’s mild winter has teased out the book vendors whom...

Digital-Age Perspective From the Electric Information Age

The Electric Information Age Book, by Jeffrey Schnapp (the faculty director of Harvard’s MetaLAB) and Adam Michaels (a cofounder of Project Projects), is the third installment in the “Inventory Books” series, which seeks “to advance the role of design as an integrated force in book editing and production . . . as a means of revitalizing the...

A Publisher Worthy of a Documentary

In the immensely enjoyable film How to Make a Book With Steidl, of the cavalcade of famous artists seen developing books with Gerhard Steidl, photographer Joel Sternfeld serves as the unwitting co-star. We watch Steidl jet around the world – a day with Robert Frank in New York, a quick trip to Paris for some...

Damn Good Design, For Damn Good Food

After high school and during college, I worked in kitchens. Today, I work in publishing and have what some might call a bit of a book habit. Not always good about restraint when it comes to both food and books, I’ve boasted about the fact that I’ve never gotten deep into cookbooks. For one...

The Consequences of Writing Without Reading

At The New Yorker Book Bench Macy Halford recently posed an important question: “What is wanting to write without wanting to read like? It’s imperative that we figure it out, because Giraldi’s right: it’s both crazy and prevalent among budding writers.” She was echoing a question asked by debut novelist William Giraldi who in...