Mad1

Mad (Magazine) Crazy…

At a time before cable television and the internet, “Mad Magazine” truly ruled and paved the way for “National Lampoon” and Saturday Night Live.

KISSMetrics infographic as seen in http://www.fastcompany.com/3009317/why-is-facebook-blue-the-science-behind-colors-in-marketing

The Science, Business and Voodoo of Color in Marketing

Color persuades—this we know for sure. So studying color in marketing, the ultimate persuasion business, seems ripe for fascinating insights. Here’s a dive into some of the latest research on the topic. I can’t think of a longer-lasting, higher-stakes design …

roy-g-biv-cover-big3_featured

ROY G. BIV is Finally Here!

Lovingly packaged with full-color illustrations on every page, “ROY G. BIV” is a great reference or inspiration for designers, artists and color-fans of every stripe. Take a rollicking tour through Jude Stewart’s book.

Colorful-Housing_featured

Wunderkammer of Color

I can only hope that fluttering some gorgeous color eye candy before your eyes will produce a lovely warming (or cooling) effect, depending on where you are.

horizontalstripes_featured

Why Do Horizontal Stripes Rule in Maternity Wear?

Jude Stewart answers a question that has plagued women for years: If horizontal stripes make you look fatter, why do they dominate maternity wear? Is it just a cruel conspiracy? The latest research suggests it’s not.

NODE+chroma digital color sensor

NODE+chroma: Changing the Way You Work + Design with Color

Imagine if digital and analog color could be simply, objectively interchanged. No matching samples, no worrying over the altering effects of ambient light, screens or perception. This is what George Yu set out to provide with NODE+chroma.

ShadesofBlack_featured

3 Emerging Pattern Trends

Pattern Observer Michelle Fifis talks about 3 emerging pattern trends that she gleaned from Indigo New York and Printsource New York — leading print shows.

Planters-booklet_featured

History For The Price Of Peanuts

I can’t say I think of Planters’ Mr. Peanut as a source of historical data, but this colorful little “Paint Book” from 1935 would seem to indicate otherwise.