Daily Heller

Daily design news and insight from Steven Heller. Sign up here for the Daily Heller—which WIRED recently described as “your CliffsNotes to the history of graphic design”—to be delivered to your inbox each week! (Note that The Daily Heller is no longer sent out as a daily email, but will be announced on a weekly basis every Friday.)

We’ve Still Got Four Freedoms (Maybe More)

Norman Rockwell's pictorial interpretation of FDR's “Four Freedoms" hit home in 1943. They were later reprinted as posters, and the story of how these posters influenced and raised the American spirit is smartly analyzed in the catalog for the first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Rockwell's depictions.

Tom Wolfe’s Satiric Passion

In 1979 Tom Wolfe, who passed away last Monday at age 88, wrote the introduction for an exhibition catalog Steven Heller produced about the German satiric magazine Simplicissimus (der Simpl).

To the Barricades

David King died at 73 in 2016. This 2017 catalog Red Star Over Russia: A Revolution In Visual Culture 1905-55 is a celebration of both the man and the collection he donated to the Tate in London.

Glaser’s Abstraction Covered

Steven Heller has habitually tried to put art and design into neat categories. Yet, as he gets older (maybe wiser), he realizes that Milton Glaser is right. The bucket-concept is not realistic. Art is about growth not limitation. And style is just a surface manifestation of many options available to us all.

Massaging the Mass-Age

Chris Riley's new book, a collection of essays, attempts to examine how leaders in social, business and political worlds can best communicate after the Mass-Age. Here, Heller asks Riley to give us a little insight into his ideas.

Why Write a Letter?

Postcards and postcard folders were (and are still in some ways) the most wonderful souvenirs to send and behold. Have a look at sets and tabletop standees from the Curt Teich & Company producer of some of the most commonly used in mid-century America.

Good Vibrations

Steven Heller has always had a soft spot in his heart for Brownjohn, Chermayeff & Geismar's vibrating typeface that was used for the Electric Circus poster.