Warn and Cover

When I was a kid, nuclear attack was the gravest fear. Every two weeks the air raid sirens blared and my class and I were ordered to “Duck and Cover.” Obviously, that wasn’t even helpful if a small bomb exploded in the schoolyard, no less a megaton device.

 

Duck-Cover-Front-FSDM2

On the radio this morning I heard about NYC Board of Education’s precautions for Ebola, a list of practical procedures. Scary as the prospect of the virus is, I’m not sure that “going to the school nurse” if a child has symptoms is the best solution. In any case, I’ve been researching some of the posters and graphics used to caution and warn about the virus.

Thankfully, they are not alarmist, but I wonder whether they should be on a higher level than the Choking Posters. The answer: Awareness at every level of literacy. Here are a few, starting with the CDC facts poster.

 

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The Design Activist’s Handbook: How to Change the World (or at Least Your Part of It) With Socially Conscious Design
In this book, authors Noah Scalin and Michelle Taute delve into how to participate in design activism while still making a living, how to obtain grants and exposure, the different types of socially conscious design, an analysis of design in the corporate world, and much more.

 

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