Do Not Hold In Hand After Lighting

Fireworks are not a toy. Or at least not a safe one. But if you were going to use “state-approved fireworks,” you probably used them the other night to help ring in the New Year. If, however, you have any left just itching to be detonated, you’ll want to take this “printed in China” message seriously and only use explosives that your state believes will do the least damage to person and property. Or as Donald Trump would say: “Este año celebre en forma segura . . .” But that’s enough ad hominem political jabber.

 

fireworks

 

It is indeed interesting to see how the Chinese depict the spectrum of American diversity in the above cautionary graphic. Although designed for our Fourth of July, it is valid for any of our firework-prone festive celebrations. But the Chinese were less politically correct or subdued with the graphics produced for the actual fireworks packaging. From the product names to the graphic designs, these labels suggest both joy and wonder at the sound and fury of gunpowder igniting on a cool winter’s eve or hot summer’s day. If you are a pyrotechnical kind of person or interested in the practice check out this PyroTalk site.

 

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