Going Dutch With Paper

Paper vendors produced some stylish catalogues and sample books during the 20th century, but few matched the bravura of Papiermolen. They employed every printing trick in the book. In fact, the Papiermolen book was a trove of great paper engineering. Among the designers in the ’30s were Koen van Os, Muratti, Jan Lutz, Ruscha Wijdeveld and others who combined the complexities of Constructivism with the beauties of modernity. This is just a sampling of the paper magic in the September 1933 edition.

 

scan-5

 

scan-6

 

scan-7

 

scan-8

 

scan-9

 

scan-10

 

scan-11

 

scan-12

 

scan-13

 

scan-14

 

scan-15

 

scan-16

 

scan-17

 

scan-18

 

scan-19

 


Support PRINT!

The experts who write for PRINT magazine cover the why of designwhy the world of design looks the way it does, how it has evolved, and why the way it looks matters. Subscribe to PRINT today, and get in on the conversation of what the brightest minds in the field are talking about right now—essential insight that every designer should know to get ahead.

Treat yourself and your team to a year of PRINT for $40—which includes the massive Regional Design Awards issue ($30 on newsstands).

print_2016issues

One thought on “Going Dutch With Paper

  1. marina

    This is gorgeous, thanks for sharing. It’s hard to believe that all this design was translated by a stripping department with a camera, razor blades, rubylith and lot’s of red tape. It really gives you a sense of the craftsmanship that was in place before electronic prepress. Mind you, it was before my time, but I can still appreciate it.

COMMENT