The Legacy of Type Design History

While rummaging through my old, forgotten type history files, I came across a cache of American Printing History Association newsletters. This one from 1988 includes a fascinating biographical essay on two more or less forgotten 19th-century type designers: the prolific Herman Ihlenburg, whose over 80 ornamental typefaces, including Arboret (a Victorian gem that in the late ’60s was a very popular phototype), and John F. Cummings, whose curlicued Kismet was also the rage in the pre-psychedelic days. Cummings also designed Satanic, which echos some more righteous ecclesiastic faces.

typoe005

Herman Ihlenburg.

typoe006

John F. Cummings.

APHA is one of those rare organizations that has a history of preserving history. Although I haven’t received the newsletter or its journal in ages, it is still actively making printing and type design history come alive. Go here for more.

 

typoe005s typoe006s


Early Bird Deadline is TODAY—enter now and save!
RDA_2016_web_ads_feb5_550x480

HDL-020516-468

2 thoughts on “The Legacy of Type Design History

  1. Paul Moxon

    Thanks for the mention of APHA. The Newsletter was incorporated into the website in 2013. As the current editor, I draw inspiration from those old printed issues, especially the ones edited by Steve Saxe from 1986–1990. Our journal Printing History is still published twice a year and sent to members. Back issues are available through RIT Press

  2. Paul Moxon

    Thanks for the mention of APHA. The Newsletter was incorporated into the website in 2013. As the current editor, draw inspiration from those old printed issues, especially the ones edited by Steve Saxe from 1986–1990. Our journal Printing History is still published twice a year and sent to members. Back issues are available through RIT Press

COMMENT