Veer on Creativity: Sketchbook Culture

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There are few things that stir the creative mind like a blank page, and few things more satisfying than a filling one with new ideas.

At Veer, you’d be hard-pressed to find many desks or meetings without at least one sketchbook. For years, our most emblematic gift to customers—and a staple in our store—have been sketchbooks containing nothing but possibility.

The most popular one was emblazoned with the mantra “I draw pictures all day”—a faster, easier way to acquiesce that your aunt or neighbor may never understand what you do for a living.

It was also a nod to the fact that when you’re toting a well-worn Moleskine, or carrying a set of dog-eared Field Notes books in your bag, you’re building a visual record of your creative career. One that you can go back to later for inspiration or comb through for unused gems.

Despite the portable devices that find their way into our daily lives, it’s safe to assume that the paper sketchbook will continue to hold sway with creatives who like to jot, scratch, sketch, and scribble down their ideas. The unlimited battery life and ability to survive repeat falls onto pavement are hard to beat.

Sketchbook scans provided by Drew Ng, Christina Huber, and Anna Coe.

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  1. Nice homage to pen and paper, especially love the phrase “building a visual record of your creative career”. Since I’m not a photographer or studio artists, my sketchbook and scrapbooks contain what I might consider the essence of my personal creativity.