Designer of the Week: Kristen Uroda

PRINT’s latest Designer of the Week, Michigan-based Kristen Uroda, will captivate you with her use of color and inspire you with her perspective on what art and design should create in our lives.

Kristen Uroda

Name: Kristen Uroda

Location: Holland, Michigan

Website: kristenuroda.com

Design school attended: Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston, MA

How would you describe your work? Playful and colorful

Where do you find inspiration?

I think I find inspiration in a lot of random things. I love nature, color wheels and paint swatches, jazz and lofi hip hop music, a quality story about adventures in space, and listening to other artists and poets talking about their work and creative process.

Illustration for Hawaii Business Magazine’s non-profit spotlight featuring a foundation that helps to educate and support families with Autistic children

Who are some of your favorite designers or artists?

I’m a sucker for Monet, Van Gogh, Degas and Toulouse-Lautrec, but I also really love Taiyo Matsumoto, Hayao Miyazaki, Oliver Jeffers and more recently, Jean Giraud.

Do you have a favorite among all the projects you’ve worked on?

I had a lot of fun doing season 2 of NPR’s “Invisibilia” podcast. Not only did I learn a lot from the podcasts themselves, the projects really stretched my creative muscles.

Kristen Uroda for NPRKristen Uroda for NPR

Kristen Uroda for NPRKristen Uroda for NPR

Is there a project that stands out to you as having been the biggest challenge of your career so far?

Not yet! 

What do you hope to accomplish in the future?

I initially became interested in drawing and illustration because of comics. I hope to make my own one day and produce a few [children’s] books as well.

What’s your best advice for designers today?

Take care of your body, schedule in rest and remember to have fun. The brain is an amazing innovator when it’s resting and playing, but there’s always the temptation to push through assignments and creativity blocks by working harder and sleeping less. The end result is a burnt-out body and dissatisfaction. Art and design should be life-giving, not life-draining. 

A Place of Rest By Night by Kristen UrodaA Place of Rest By Night

Kristen Uroda for NPRKristen Uroda for NPR; Reference: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Kristen Uroda for NPRKristen Uroda for NPR

I Can Do It! by Kristen UrodaI Can Do It!


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