daily heller 3-19-14_f

Campari Salut!

Campari may be bitter as an aperitivo but its advertising campaigns beginning in the 1920s were tasty, often with an avant-garde air. These are advertisements from successive 1937 issues of Corriere della Sera that stand out on the black-and-white page.

daily heller 3-17-14_f

Getting In and Out of a Pickle

Where does the phrase “in a pickle” originate? Explore this and Heinz’s role in the proliferation of the common expression.

daily heller 3-14-14_f

The Starch Bomb

Explore a pamphlet produced for Muzzy’s starch, which is an example of Victorian design among other things.

daily heller 3-13-14_f

Taking Off: The Sis Tapestry (and Book)

A new exhibition with Peter Sis’ illustrations for “The Little Prince” is currently open. Sis has also designed a Bayeux-sized tapestry — view the handiwork that’s going into making this piece.

daily heller 3-11-14_f

Powers of Ten to the Tenth Power

Steven Heller explains why he was “enthralled ” with Charles and Ray Eames’ “Powers of Ten” documentary and Kees Boeke’s “Cosmic View: The Universe in 40 Jumps” book.

daily heller 3-10-14_f

A Coup Worthy of Mad Men

Milton Glaser was enticed to return to a style that helped put him on the map in the ’60s for the campaign promoting the new season of “Mad Men.” Take a deeper look at Glaser’s iconic work.

daily heller 3-7-14_f

John Sloan’s Art Nouveau

John Sloan was a member of the storied “Philadelphia Five,” and brought Art Noveau to the America public’s attention. Learn more about his career and view several examples of his work.

daily heller 3-5-14_f

European Under, Middle and Overgrounds

The quantity of European alternative pubs and tabs published during the Seventies was extraordinary. In 2000, the exhibition Die Kunst der Zeitschrift (The Art of Newspapers) hung at the Kasseler Kunstverein. View several examples of journals from this time.

daily heller 2-28-14_f

Better Off A Forgotten Illustrator Than A Rotten One

In 1977 a new illustration credit appeared on the Letters and OpEd pages of The New York Times. S. Harmon wasn’t doing anything new. It was the same collage style that Surrealist and Dada collagists had done decades before. Take a look at the work of this forgotten illustrator.