Its All In The Nib

Drawing letters by hand — at least in the old days – required having the right tools, and that means nibs (pen points of differing shapes) that result in varied weight lines.

I make a point of collecting the manuals that promoted the various nibs (and niblets), like the classic Speedball and other competing brands, Here are some made by Brause, from the northern land of blackletter.

brausebrause 5 brause 4 brause 3 brause 2 brause 1brause 8

brause 7

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Love this post, Steve! I have used Brause nibs since the early 1970s, they are really crisp and have a great tensile strength that can take a lot of pressure. I required all my calligraphy students to use them, too. They do have a slight cant to the edge, which requires a small adjustment in how you would hold the pen to achieve the required angle to the writing line, they are not square cut like most other broad edged nibs. I sharpen them a bit on my Arkansas stone but they only need a little work. If they are properly cleaned and cared for they will last forever.