Separated Years After Birth

Max Körner (1883-1963), who I wrote about two weeks ago, left behind more than a bunch of obscure trademarks. Thanks to Daily Heller private eye and public nose sleuth, Mirko Ilic, we see (below) that Bluetooth owes a rather obvious debt to this less known German logo designer for his 1922 Behinger and Co. original.

bluetooth-logo 1922

 


For more Steven Heller, check out The Education of a Graphic Designer, one of the many Heller titles available at MyDesignShop.com.

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Actually, it is more complex and probably not a rip off.
    From Wikipedia: “The word “Bluetooth” is an anglicised version of the Scandinavian Blåtand/Blåtann, the epithet of the tenth-century king Harald I of Denmark and parts of Norway who united dissonant Danish tribes into a single kingdom. The idea of this name was proposed by Jim Kardach who developed a system that would allow mobile phones to communicate with computers (at the time he was reading Frans Gunnar Bengtsson’s historical novel The Long Ships about Vikings and king Harald Bluetooth).[5] The implication is that Bluetooth does the same with communications protocols, uniting them into one universal standard.[6][7][8]

    The Bluetooth logo is a bind rune merging the Younger Futhark runes Runic letter ior.svg (Hagall) (ᚼ) and Runic letter berkanan.svg (Bjarkan) (ᛒ), Harald’s initials.”