Women at War

Women at War

The Atlantic documents the involvement of women during World War II in all the combatant nations. See the feature here.

While relatively few women were at the front lines as combatants, many found themselves the victims of bombing campaigns and invading armies. By the end of the war, more than 2 million women worked in war industries, hundreds of thousands volunteered as nurses or members of home defense units, or became full-time members of the military. In the Soviet Union alone, some 800,000 women served alongside men in army units during the war. Collected here are images of women involved directly in the events of World War II, and some of what they experienced and endured. A note: most of the captions are from the original sources from the 1940s, complete with the frequent use of the term “girl” to describe young women.

The photograph above is:

The art assembly line of female students busily engaged in copying World War II propaganda posters in Port Washington, New York, on July 8, 1942. The master poster is hanging in the background. (AP Photo/Marty Zimmerman).


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