International Design

The arena of international design is vast, and Imprint sorts through the chaff, highlighting exemplary work created by international design firms and small studios that would otherwise remain unknown. With an eye to discovering unique sensibilities, Imprint covers topics such as typography, posters, books, magazines, and motion graphics, showcasing European innovations, Japanese design, and work from the Middle East.

Postcards from the Edge: An Interview with Jim Heimann

When I was a kid, I loved to buy postcards from places along the route of my family’s dreaded annual road trip. This was 1980s America, so most of the postcards—unless they were vintage-inspired or found at thrift stores—had no charm and reeked of boosterism. They offered little visual delight, but the ones that...

Eyes on Iran

Taarof is a Persian term that describes a certain kind of social negotiation among Iranians. “It’s this game that starts off whenever you see friends,” says Afsoon Talai, “this exchange and back and forth.” Talai is the visual editor of a new magazine called B|ta’arof that is interested in exchange of the cultural kind—among...

The Disturbing, Ethereal Comics of C.S. Pego, a Mexican Artist in Exile

I first met Cecilia “C.S.” Pego in Artists’ Alley at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. A native of Mexico City, she was there to promote her new graphic novel, Exilia: The Invisible Path. I found it visually stunning, not to mention a welcome relief from all the soulless superhero stuff. In the first half of our...

Mexico’s Graphic Novel Diva on Sociopaths, Serial Killers, and Progressive Politics

Cecilia “C.S.” Pego established a reputation in her native Mexico as “La Diva de la Novela Grafica Mexicana.” Her characteristic use of bold blacks give her comics their graphic power. But her art continues to evolve in sophistication. Sardonia y Chamuco, her 1990s editorial strip, has an hallucinogenic, Skip Williamson–like underground comix intensity. Her jagged, spiky...

Netanyahu Bombs at the U.N.

If Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu were a stand-up comic, he couldn’t have been funnier. Yet sadly for him, the visual aid he surprisingly introduced during his U.N. General Assembly speech last week, illustrating the serious need to draw a red line on Iran’s nuclear ambitions, was a dud. Perhaps because it may not...

A Nose for Controversy: Jerusalem's Af Magazine

Jerusalem is not an easy place to be an artist. Inevitably, every doodler, printmaker, painter, and sculptor who works in the Holy City finds his or her creative output filtered through the lens of Israeli politics. And you can hardly blame the audience for this tendency; blocking out the clamor of the artist’s environment...

Independent Voices: Singapore's Unique Design Community

“Without a common written or spoken language then, graphic design became a means to communicate to this multiracial community,” writes Justin Zhuang in the introduction to Independence: The History of Graphic Design in Singapore Since the 1960s. The book, commissioned by the Design Society and published earlier this year, chronicles the rapid growth and...

Roadside Beautification: Japanese Gas-Tank Art

In the 1970s, the peace artist and former Sister of the Immaculate Heart of Mary Corita Kent painted the Rainbow Mural on a gas tank in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Driving into Boston, this landmark made you smile. Since then, he Japanese have been doing their own version of gas-tank art—adding the spark of wit, transforming the otherwise Death...

Seeing the Olympics from a Different Perspective

As Londoner Gareth Hague commented in this space in early July, the pomp and national pride that usually marches in during every Olympic cycle has been supplanted by ridicule, aggravation, and protest, thanks to an Olympics that is, as the New Statesman put it, “suffocated by sponsors.” The angst that the denizens of London...

The Education of a Typographic Innovator

Rolando G. Alcantara was born and raised in Torreón, an industrial city in north-central Mexico. He attended a technical high school there. Since childhood, he’d planned to become a doctor—a radiologist, like his mom. A few weeks ago, he received his MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and brought a compelling presentation...