J. J. Sedelmaier

Hirschfeld, Do Re Mi, and Peacock Feet

  I’ve always loved Al Hirschfeld’s work. It seems so timeless and each image he created was always a treat to visually wander through—even without his playful “Ninas.” He had solidly established his style of designed caricature by the mid 1930’s and it changed little until he passed away in 2003. While browsing in...

Covering Print Magazine, 1940-1953

The magazine we all call Print has had a half dozen different names since its inception in June of 1940. It was originally a limited-edition periodical that discussed the endless techniques used in the graphic arts industry, and even included original prints and tipped-in features within. From its first edition up to Volume VII,...

Graphically Seasoned Greetings!

Last year at this time, I did a post on past holiday cards that J.J. Sedelmaier Productions, Inc. has sent out over the years. This year I’m presenting some of the greetings the studio has RECEIVED throughout the years! They all speak for themselves . . . and my apologies to Steven Heller and...

Many Happy (Tax) Returns: A Marxist Doctrine

With all of us looking at the Fiscal Cliff on the horizon, who better to explain things than Marx . . . . . . GROUCHO Marx. About 15 years ago, I traded my signed copy of The Groucho Letters to the animation creator/director Tom Warburton for his 1942 edition of Groucho Marx’s second...

Winsor McCay Illustrates Temperance — or Prohibition?, 1929

While strolling through a used-books store in Los Angeles over 20 years ago, I spied the dust-jacketed binding of a book with a familiar illustration style. Much to my delight, I’d found a little-known 1929 first edition volume published by the Hearst Company concerning Prohibition—and primarily illustrated by the brilliant comic-strip artist and animation...

R. Crumb's Sketchbooks

Robert “R.” Crumb is one of my favorite artists. Underground cartoonist, designer, illustrator, “drawer”—they all seem like inadequate titles when attached to his body of work. There was a show recently at the Society of Illustrators in New York City that solidly put a piece of punctuation on all the admiration I have for...

Watty Piper's 1930 “The Little Engine That Could”

When I was a very young child (circa 1960), one of the first books I was given was a 1930 edition of Watty Piper’s The Little Engine That Could. I’ve loved trains since I was a kid and I’m convinced this little tome was an early contribution to what’s become an obsession. It would...

Graphically Crazy Like a Nathan

I got to know Nathan Fox through Steven Heller and  the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay program at the School of Visual Arts in NYC. Steve called and wondered if I could meet with Nathan to discuss animation possibilities with him. I was beyond impressed with Nathan’s combination of storytelling, illustration, and his awesome...

“Writers I Have Loved”—The Graphic Reflections Of Joshua Landsman

I’ve known Joshua Landsman for over 45 years. We went to the same junior-high/high school in Evanston, lllinois, and even worked on our school newsletter together. I was always in awe of his writing talent—and sense of humor. He’s since written screenplays and one-act plays—his “Frank Talk About Matters Big And Small” played at...

Fight Talk: A WWII Poster Campaign

The Second World War saw the participation of countless corporations steering and converting their talents and resources toward the war effort. At the end of the war, many of these corporations took advantage of their contributions to produce promotional pieces that highlighted their involvement. For instance, the Chrysler Corporation published a four-volume set of...