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Get Your Irish Up

The Catholic Truth Society of Ireland was founded in 1899, its mission to expunge the “scourge of foreign influence, in the form of British and American books, films, magazines and newspapers,” wrote Naill McCormack, editor of Vintage Values: Classic Pamphlet Cover Design From Twentieth-Century Ireland and author of Vintage Irish Book Covers blog. I asked McCormack to tell us more about CTS and its design legacy.

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When Typography Hit The Airwaves

Tony Wons was a popular personality during the depression receiving 2,000 fan letters a week. Tony Wons Scrapbook is a conversational show and he is like an old friend who stops by for a chat.

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A Happy Book About Death

The Rainbow Box was a series of four books written by Joseph Pintauro (b.1930) and illustrated and designed by Norman Laliberté (b.1925). They were published as a boxed set (Harper & Row,1970).

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Soviet Literary Pulps

Take a look at Krasnaya Nov (The Red Virgin Land) was the first Soviet literary magazine, which was established in 1921, along with several other examples.

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Metzl’s Mad Men

The Advertising Conference by The Goswogii by Richard Henry Little and illustrated by Ervine Metzl was published in 1927. While there was a reprint of the original, the book is something of a mystery. Ervine Metzl is not.

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Featured RDA Winner: Harvard Review Covers

These covers for Harvard Review (a literary journal) are comprised of geometric forms which take a cue from the angular and curvilinear forms found in the typeface used for the journal’s title (a modified version of House Industries’ Neutraface).

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Graphics For A Fortune

Fortune Magazine isn’t necessarily known to be the most graphically compelling publication. That is, unless you look back to the magazine’s first 15 years, starting in 1929. Find out who penned the illustration for its original prototype—a rare piece!

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Picturing War Before It Went Digital

In September 1914, the New York Times published a “Mid-Week Pictorial War Extra” as a Wednesday photographic supplement. It continued after the end of World War I and became known simply as the Mid-Week Pictorial. These images are from a 1915 edition.

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Paper Promo Promotes Prints and Printing

Dimensions was a quarterly publication of the Simpson Lee Paper Company founded in Vicksburg, Mississippi, to demonstrate different types of paper and different properties of paper. Today and tomorrow, I’ll show two exemplary issues.