Publication Design

Publication design is at the heart of communicating effectively—for media outlets, artists, and promotional projects alike. Imprint shows you the best publication design, highlighting effective strategies and examples of the most resonant work in books, magazines, newspapers, comics, and the entirety of design publications. Through this, you can learn to convey narrative, information, opinion, and art in a way best suited to each project.


Pocket Book Publishing

US: The Paperback Magazine premiered in June 1969. It was edited by music critic and Village Voice contributor, Richard Goldstein. See why US deserves a place in design history.


Preparing For War, Russian Style

In the lead-up to the Great War, which wasn't so great but it was mightily destructive, the Russian press was at once oblivious and concerned. These three newsprint magazines, present the panoply of engagement.


Before The Tea Party

Patriotism and revolution went hand in hand in during the late '60s and early '70s when the "new left" was challenging the authority of government. Even before the so-called Tea Party adopted the American Revolution's finest slogan and flag (designed by Benjamin Franklin), members of the Students For A Democratic Society (SDS) appropriated the...


A Mag For Goodfellas

I was the co-publisher and art director of Mobster Times. The magazine started as a vendetta against the former art directors of Screw, Brill and Waldstein, who left in a huff and founded and published Monster Times, a sci-fi tabloid, and grew into its own entity.


Have You Got Self Esteem Issues?

Physical perfection has been big business in the U.S. since the nineteenth century. Take a look at these ads in the literary journal, The Black Cat (1895–1922).


Marinetti’s Pre-Futurism

"Poesia" magazine is the foreplay before the birth of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Futurism. Look inside this publication that advocated symbolist and romantic poetry in Italy.


Overcoming Graphic Malaise

This selling tool for American Crayon Company vividly shows how modernism transformed the ordinary graphic malaise of the 1930s, '40s and early '50s.