art spiegelman

daily heller 1-15-14 featured

Spiegelman Speaks at Wordless!

Art Spiegelman's "Intellectual Vaudeville Show," WORDLESS! will make its New York debut at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Read a bit more about Spiegelman and this event.

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Ted Rall’s “Censored” Obama Cartoon and Other Controversies

Are editorial decisions really censorship? When I discussed the issue with Ted Rall, America’s most widely read alternative editorial cartoonist, he was unequivocal: “To edit is to censor. It’s true. Look it up in the dictionary.” And thus, his latest blog column headline is “I have been censored by Daily Kos.” I recommend that you...

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A Stan Mack Cartoon Chronicle of Revolutions Foretold

Stan Mack’s “Real Life Funnies” strip, created in the mid-1970s for the “Village Voice,” presaged the documentary comics of artists such as Art Spiegelman and Joe Sacco. And now it appears that his Print feature from 17 years ago also anticipated today’s digital communications environment. Here’s Mack’s personal, behind-the-scenes details about one such story....

Paul Krassner on Obama, Orgies, and the Art of Offensive Cartoons

There’s something oddly funny about Paul Krassner. And it’s been going on for more than 50 years. He palled around with Lenny Bruce, the pioneering 1950s “sick” comic, and even edited Bruce’s autobiography, How to Talk Dirty and Influence People. He was instrumental in founding the Yippies!, those radical “Groucho Marxists” who fought the establishment...

Illustrated Classics of African-American Literature

Students: If you plan to cheat on your book reports, take a look at Graphic Classics. As Art Spiegelman put it, “Comics are a gateway drug to literacy”; for the visually oriented, this series will open doors to literature. It’s also a stunning contrast to those dreadful 1950s Classics Illustrated comic books, with their dry,...

What Harvey Pekar Did For Comics

Harvey Pekar did not invent autobiographical comics. In the American comics tradition alone, the pioneering female cartoonist Fay King regularly inserted herself as a character in her Jazz Age cartoons and comic strips. Robert Crumb, the illustrator of some of Pekar’s most memorable works, took the self as a subject in several of his...