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Paolo Soleri’s Visionary Book

Paolo Soleri, a visionary architect and designer of Arcosanti, the eccentric arts settlement in the Arizona desert that was a mecca for young creative-types during the hippie-era and a pioneer of the sustainable architecture movement, died at 93 this week. …

Editor’s Choice: What can we learn…

Today and tomorrow, the Design Group Editors have been given a great deal of power. For the next two days, their favorite books are half cover Print’s MyDesignShop.com price. What can we learn from an Editor’s Pick? Let’s take a …

Wunderkammer of Color: January 2013 Edition

What’s the very latest in the bright kaleidoscopic world of color? Let’s reach into the grab bag and find out. Many of you know I’m a sucker for oddball coloring books. So I just about leapt out of my skin at …

Los Angeles Views "Graphic Design: Now in Production"

At a Hammer Museum panel last month, Willem Henri Lucas introduced himself, Gail Swanlund, and Brian Roettinger as three L.A.-based designers who were about to discuss a current exhibition of contemporary graphic design in which none of them were included. …

What Is the Essence of a Book?

Over the last couple of months, I have been picking my way through I Read Where I Am, “82 reflections on the future forms of reading.” In the book, some contributors claim that we read less than we used to, …

Many Happy (Tax) Returns: A Marxist Doctrine

With all of us looking at the Fiscal Cliff on the horizon, who better to explain things than Marx . . . . . . GROUCHO Marx. About 15 years ago, I traded my signed copy of The Groucho Letters …

Bucky Fuller's Book: "I Seem To Be a Topsy-Turvy Design"

Last week, Steven Heller covered Quentin Fiore, designer of books by the medieval-minded media theorist Marshall McLuhan and the yuppie-brained Yippie leader Jerry Rubin. Heller also mentioned a 1970 paperback that the architect/engineer/designer R. Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller put together with Fiore …

My Ideal Bookshelf: The Books That Make the Designer

Visually, the average bookshelf is a mess. Arranged along single planks are these hundreds of objects of every conceivable dimension and color, spanning decades—centuries, even—of our cultural history. Stately black-and-orange Penguin Classics butt against the garish hues of a science …