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Illustration Therapy

Gregory didn't start drawing until he was in his thirties and admits that he never considered himself an artist. His occupational roadmap begins at a slaughterhouse, meanders through a record store, the White House, McDonald's and several advertising agencies, but perhaps not exactly in that order.

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A Stan Mack Cartoon Chronicle of Revolutions Foretold

Stan Mack’s “Real Life Funnies” strip, created in the mid-1970s for the “Village Voice,” presaged the documentary comics of artists such as Art Spiegelman and Joe Sacco. And now it appears that his Print feature from 17 years ago also anticipated today’s digital communications environment. Here’s Mack’s personal, behind-the-scenes details about one such story....

Li'l Abner's Al Capp: A Monstrous Creature, a Masterful Cartoonist

No doubt about it: Al Capp engaged in depraved behavior. Most disgraceful was his attempted rape of a number of women, from college co-eds to Grace Kelly. And, as the interview below suggests, there may be more. Capp also created Li’l Abner, once one of America’s most acclaimed comic strips. It began in 1934,...

Paul Krassner on Obama, Orgies, and the Art of Offensive Cartoons

There’s something oddly funny about Paul Krassner. And it’s been going on for more than 50 years. He palled around with Lenny Bruce, the pioneering 1950s “sick” comic, and even edited Bruce’s autobiography, How to Talk Dirty and Influence People. He was instrumental in founding the Yippies!, those radical “Groucho Marxists” who fought the establishment...

The Disturbing, Ethereal Comics of C.S. Pego, a Mexican Artist in Exile

I first met Cecilia “C.S.” Pego in Artists’ Alley at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. A native of Mexico City, she was there to promote her new graphic novel, Exilia: The Invisible Path. I found it visually stunning, not to mention a welcome relief from all the soulless superhero stuff. In the first half of our...

Mexico’s Graphic Novel Diva on Sociopaths, Serial Killers, and Progressive Politics

Cecilia “C.S.” Pego established a reputation in her native Mexico as “La Diva de la Novela Grafica Mexicana.” Her characteristic use of bold blacks give her comics their graphic power. But her art continues to evolve in sophistication. Sardonia y Chamuco, her 1990s editorial strip, has an hallucinogenic, Skip Williamson–like underground comix intensity. Her jagged, spiky...

Comics in Wonderland: Roger Langridge's Lewis Carroll Mash-up

As Roger Langridge noted in last week’s interview, his comics are a mix of British sitcom, vaudeville theater, E.C. Segar, and Samuel Beckett. They’re usually parceled out in short, snappy sequences—but his newest, published in a dozen installments by Boom! Studios, runs over 300 pages. Snarked! is populated with Alice in Wonderland characters, costarring the...

Susie Cagle on Occupy Protests, Opinion Reporting, and the Death of Editorial Cartooning

Susie Cagle’s dad, Daryl, is the go-to guy for newspaper editorial cartoons: he runs the Political Cartoonists Index and creates single-panel cartoons for MSNBC.com. But as Susie sees it, that one-image format is just about dead. Doing her own thing with the illustration medium, Susie is a “graphic journalist.” “Drawing the news” is far from...

A Report on Comic-Con… and Covert CIA Actions

Last week’s Comic-Con at San Diego’s Convention Center was overloaded with activities. If you were a Hollywood celeb–obsessed fan you may have spent much, if not most, of your time stuck in lines. But if you were a lover of well-designed graphic narratives, you needn’t have wasted one idle moment during the five full...