graphic novel

Comics in Wonderland: Roger Langridge's Lewis Carroll Mash-up

As Roger Langridge noted in last week’s interview, his comics are a mix of British sitcom, vaudeville theater, E.C. Segar, and Samuel Beckett. They’re usually parceled out in short, snappy sequences—but his newest, published in a dozen installments by Boom! Studios, runs over 300 pages. Snarked! is populated with Alice in Wonderland characters, costarring the...

The Voyeurs: Diary of a Charming Neurotic

Gabrielle Bell is an introvert in a world of extroverts, an overthinker navigating a landscape of overstimulation. Fortunately, she’s discovered the forgotten secret of autobiographical comics: not only is it OK to make stuff up, but it’s often a very good idea. The short pieces collected in The Voyeurs (Uncivilized Books)—many of which first...

Breaking News and Making Money: Susie Cagle and Ted Rall on Print vs. Online Publishing

This is the second part of my two-part interview with the graphic journalist Susie Cagle. In part one, based on one of her San Diego Comic-Con panels, Cagle touched upon print versus online methods of content distribution. Here, she discusses her second SDCC session, Publisher’s Weekly‘s “Serious Pictures: Comics and Journalism in the New...

A Report on Comic-Con… and Covert CIA Actions

Last week’s Comic-Con at San Diego’s Convention Center was overloaded with activities. If you were a Hollywood celeb–obsessed fan you may have spent much, if not most, of your time stuck in lines. But if you were a lover of well-designed graphic narratives, you needn’t have wasted one idle moment during the five full...

Stan Mack’s Occupy-the-Fourth-of-July Funnies

It’s 1776 in Philadelphia. Congressional delegates “sweat, swat flies, and argue independence.” They retreat to a tavern and casually dump Jefferson with the job of composing a declaration: “Tom, write us something dignified, yet magical.” Once he’s finished, all the congressmen shout out changes at him: “Drop ‘independent’;” “Why ‘happiness’ instead of ‘property’? What’s...

Not the Harvey Pekar Graphic Novel You'd Expect

Harvey Pekar had been collaborating with the comic book artist JT Waldman on a book project, one that charts the journey from his Zionist upbringing to his questioning of Israel’s role in the world. But Pekar died in July 2010. Still, Waldman continued to work on it, and now it’s about to be published. Peter...