graphic novels

Complete Anarchy, Illustrated

As the Tea Party and Occupy movements fade from the political scene, anarchy is still visible . . . well, its graphics are, anyway. In England, Autonomy: The Cover Designs of Anarchy, 1961–1970 just hit the streets. And PM Press is singlehandedly keeping anarchy alive with an impressive catalog of revolutionary fare that covers...

The Disturbing, Ethereal Comics of C.S. Pego, a Mexican Artist in Exile

I first met Cecilia “C.S.” Pego in Artists’ Alley at this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. A native of Mexico City, she was there to promote her new graphic novel, Exilia: The Invisible Path. I found it visually stunning, not to mention a welcome relief from all the soulless superhero stuff. In the first half of our...

Mexico’s Graphic Novel Diva on Sociopaths, Serial Killers, and Progressive Politics

Cecilia “C.S.” Pego established a reputation in her native Mexico as “La Diva de la Novela Grafica Mexicana.” Her characteristic use of bold blacks give her comics their graphic power. But her art continues to evolve in sophistication. Sardonia y Chamuco, her 1990s editorial strip, has an hallucinogenic, Skip Williamson–like underground comix intensity. Her jagged, spiky...

Homer, Chwast, and The Odyssey

Seymour Chwast’s latest graphic novel—or “visual epic,” as it’s been described in the upper levels of the Academy—is just out, joining his stirring adaptations of The Canterbury Tales and The Divine Comedy. The Odyssey, one of the most dreaded tomes on my high school reading list, is made beautifully compact and wittily digestible. If...

Eliza Frye: How to Succeed in Comics, Online and Off

When Eliza Frye used Kickstarter to fund her first hardcover collection of graphic stories, she raised more than double her goal amount. In this, the conclusion of our two-part talk, she discusses a variety of topics, including online comics, comics conventions, and other projects. You’ll find part one here. And you’ll find Eliza this...

The Comics of Eliza Frye: A Gateway to the Sequential Arts

A lady is murdered. She was a Parisian prostitute. We meet some people who knew her. A bloody butcher. A flower merchant. A client. A painter for whom she modeled. A few others. We attend her burial. The murderer is revealed, the story ends. With a minimum of dialogue, the dark, tense eroticism of...

Camilla d’Errico on Inspiration, Pop Surrealism, and "Inappropriate" Images

“Censorship and the Female Artist” was the subject of one of this year’s San Diego Comic-Con panels. The women on the dais discussed the presentation of strong female characters, public reaction to their work, and the male gaze. Comparing her approach to women’s bodies with that of male artists, the erotic pinup illustrator Olivia...