pop culture

Andy Warhol’s Interview Magazine Finally Shuts Up

Interview magazine has just ceased publication, not quite a half-century after it began. Here, Michael Dooley shares a 2005 review of a seven-volume set of books titles "Andy Warhol's Interview: The Crystal Ball of Pop Culture" that reads a little more like an obituary than a review.

09/09/2014: Simpsons marathon advertising

Still reeling from the 12-day marathon that set ratings records for the new FXX television station and reignited the spark of a 25-year old animated TV show? Not only was the Simpsons marathon a ratings success, it spawned a number of surreal artistic tributes, including this poster, created by Gravillis Inc. The LA-based design...

04/09/2014: Minimalist pop culture icons

Barcelona-based design studio Hey create these instantly recognizable illustrations of pop culture icons on their Instagram account EveryHey. No one is off limits – movie stars (Bill Murray), painters (Pablo Picasso), fairy tale heros (Snow White) and fictional teenage werewolves (Teen Wolf) are depicted in the same simplified and entertaining style. Follow along here....

Image of the Day: 10/17/2013: Typography posters

Budapest-based design Áron Jancsó has created a series of beautiful typography-based posters, that vary in focus from abstract letterforms that highlight a particular typeface to entertaining pop cultural references quoting movies and music. Check out a gallery of them here. Via Looks Like Good Design.

Pop Art, Politics, and Critiques of Contemporary Culture

  Popular culture, capitalist critique, and female empowerment are among the topics of this, the last of a three-part feature on “Pop and Politics,” one of the programs at the 100th annual College Art Association conference in Los Angeles. Part one, my interview with Anthony E. Grudin about Andy Warhol and comic books, is...

The Pleasures, Politics, and Proto-Feminisms of Pop Art

In 1963, Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique drew attention to the stifling state of American womanhood, and Roy Lichtenstein painted what might be considered a visual analogue: “Drowning Girl”, who’d rather be engulfed by tidal waves than call Brad for help. It was also the year Andy Warhol began his grungy, frightening Race Riot...