Rolling Stone


How the Oxford Rule Led to Rolling Stone

The Oxford rule sounds like article of law, but in reality it is something more mundane: a thick and thin line that sits side by side. Still, this fairly innocuous device has its origins in the earliest printings in recorded history.


When The Stone Was Rolling

"Rolling Stone" was tied with politics and culture, and this cover in which Ralph Steadman created a political caricature is no different.

An L.A. View of Meggs's N.Y. School of Design

Everyone will approach the fifth edition of Meggs’ History of Graphic Design through their own personal filters. Steve Heller’s already done his overview of the print and digital versions. Paul Shaw may pick up his Blue Pencil to correct factual and editorial errors. Marxist and feminist critics might deal with the two Martha Stewart...

A View From Inside the 1960s Music Revolution

“When did music become so important?” That’s Don Draper from last week’s Mad Men, set in 1966. Later in the episode he turns off “Tomorrow Never Knows,” from the Beatles album Revolver, and walks out of the room. There’s something happening here, but you don’t know what it is—do you, Mr. Draper? One year later, Rolling...