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Those Confounding Maps

Visual Editions has been exploring the rocky terrain of current and future books – design, delivery and platform. Their most recent release, Where You Are is a book of maps and website that collects writing (non-fiction and fiction) and visuals (drawings, photographs, paintings) and tests the common notions of what a map is.

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Weekend Heller: Plagiarism, No. Thanksgivanukkha, Si.

If you’re looking for a definition of plagiarism look below and read this story about a ripoff of Louise Fili’s logo for a Texas restaurant, Aventino, from LogoThief. There’s copying and then there’s COPYING. And seriously, if you’re going to copy, don’t do every little graphic flourish.

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Dr. Hans Sachs’ Posters for Sale

The recent discovery of lost Nazi looted Modern masterpieces, has brought Hitler’s criminal art activities back to the forefront. Dr. Hans Sachs, poster collector, editor of Das Plakat, the magazine that advocated for standards of early German advertising art, and whose his vast collection was confiscated by Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, narrowly escaped the Holocaust. Recently, after years of court wrangling, his holdings, many of which were in major German collections, were returned to his family.

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Elegantissima: The Exhibition and The Boudoir

Elegantissima,: The Design and Typography of Louise Fili, the monograph by Louise Fili, is now an exhibition with the same name opening on Thursday, November 21 at The Memorial Gallery at Farmingdale State College.

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Immoveable Type

Stencil was a moveable immoveable form of typesetting. In the early 1900′s, S.G. Monce Inc. manufactured the IMPROVED INTERCHANGEABLE “LOCK” STENCIL set with complete set of capital letters, numbers,and more. The only thing that’s old fashioned about this set is, that it was made in the early 1900s.

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When Visitors Were Carded

There was a time when everyone of a certain social status – upper classes mostly – carried name cards and showed them every time they visited a friend, neighbor or acquaintance. Visiting cards (also known as calling cards) were the social norm, the etiquette of 18th and 19th Century Europe (and those who aspired to be European in the U.S.A.).

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Signs With Cambodian Flair

Sam Roberts was working in advertising and living in Stoke Newington, London, when he noticed the fading remains of advertising that was once painted by hand directly onto the brickwork of buildings. He’s now the master of the Ghostsigns website and recently published a book on the Hand-Painted Signs of Kratie, Cambodia. I asked him to walk us through the routes he’s taken to find the roots of vintage commercial and hand-painted signs.

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Oded Ezer, Mad Typographic Scientist

The iconoclastic Israeli graphic designer, typographer and type designer Oded Ezer is in residence on the East Coast for two months, lecturing and teaching a class called “Type Follows Emotion, Personal Typographic Exploration” at Rhode Island School of Design. Perhaps …

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The Forgotten Typographic Art of Price Tags

Next to cash register receipts, common price tags are arguably the most taken for granted pieces of graphic design. Many today are rendered by computer, so why bother showering them with respect. Some are, of course, handwritten without the flair of a true letterer. And most are stock designs that come from a few different business stationery outlets that sell various merchant necessities.

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Mad (Magazine) Crazy…

At a time before cable television and the internet, “Mad Magazine” truly ruled and paved the way for “National Lampoon” and Saturday Night Live.