Another Renaissance Genius?

Ezio d’Errico (1892-1972) was writer, painter and playwright, born in Agrigento. He died in the most “guilty isolation, surrounded by his paintings and with only his wife next to him,” notes a brief bio. Author of thrillers published with Mondadori, of theater works translated and represented also abroad, among the first abstract painters in Italy, and the editor of the obscure (today) Italian graphic design magazine Graphicus, d’Errico, a sort of Renaissance genius, is still a figure in a  universe yet to be explored.

His biographical history seem wrapped in an aura of mystery: he left Sicily moved to Paris, where he attempted the “adventure of a painter” and where he met important modern artists. Then, he returned to Italy, to Turin, to teach drawing: Among his students, the designer Armando Testa, who, as he later admitted, knew the works of Picasso, Chagall and Mirò thanks to his small reproductions in the magazine Graphicus, for which the same Ezio d’Errico claimed to create, among other things, the first abstract cover in Italy.

Ezio d'Errico drew the first abstract cover in Italy.

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