Design Culture

When the U.S. Army Banned a Comic Book About War

It was 1966, in the midst of the Vietnam War. President Johnson was escalating his lies to Congress and the public that prolonged this horrific and unwinnable South Asian conflict. And in that year, America suffered 6,350 fatal military casualties, well over triple the number of deaths in 1965. And a war comic titled...

Thomas Cole For Kids

What attracts me to Thomas Cole (February 1, 1801 – February 11, 1848) is that he was the founder of the Hudson River School, a group of American artists who sought to depict the unspoiled majesty of the American landscape around the Hudson River Valley in New York State. I love that part of the...

The Chatter Of Type

  Through its publications and gallery, the Composing Room promoted the new American design. The Composing Room in New York was no mere type shop. While no other type business was more aggressively self-promoting, none so determinedly advanced the art and craft of type design or made such a remarkable contribution to design history...

The Rand Book That Never Was

Paul Rand’s first monograph, “Thoughts on Design” (Wittenborn, 1947, reprinted by Chronicle Books), showcased and explained his “first stage” from when he launched his design and art directorial career in 1937 at Esquire/Coronet. He was occasionally involved in the editorial layout of Esquire fashion supplements but mostly designed promotion and a brilliant series of...

Promoting the Times Is Timely

Even before The New York Times newspaper was graphically designed to enter the 20th century, its promotion department created memorable graphic design that underscored the greatness of the institution and won the hearts and minds of New Yorkers (like me). Opening on Wednesday Sept 5 at the Times Building, a mini-exhibition produced by the...