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Type Tuesday: The Super Super-Elliptical Turbine

A couple weeks back, the type publisher Fontwerk launched—and today, we’re taking a closer look at Felix Braden’s Turbine, one of the label’s initial releases.


Fans of Braden’s work know that each of his typefaces has a name associated with water, and with Turbine, he sought to embrace the technical and mechanical aspects of it.


The distinct Neo-Grotesque features open apertures, low stroke contrast and, most notably, super-elliptical curves.



“This fine geometric feature (a mixture of ellipse and rectangle, also known as Lamé curve) has often been applied in architecture, urban planning, product and interior design, and its application exudes a friendly, approachable appearance,” Braden writes. “This type of design became particularly popular in the ’60s and ’70s, and this look and feel spills over into Turbine, giving it a little bit of a retro feel.”


That being said, the face’s angular curves (and low contrast) make it an ideal contender for contemporary applications such as web and app design.


Turbine is also international in nature: Operating across seven weights, it features 489 glyphs, supporting all Western, Eastern and Central European languages.


Check it out—and test it out—at Fontwerk.








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