Editor’s Letter: February 2010

[Ed. note: This article originally appears as an introduction to the February 2010 issue, celebrating the 70th anniversary of Print.] — “Printing has been my heart throb since 1886 when, with the help of a partner my age, I began …

Zigmunds Lapsa

  Zigmunds Lapsa isn’t easily fazed. He grew up in Riga, the capital of Latvia, which he describes as a “country with 2.3 million people and 5.4 graphic designers at that time.” After two years in an unstimulating local design …

Introduction to the 2007 European Design Annual

A Scotsman, a German, and a Swede walk into a design magazine office—you know how this one goes, don’t you? They judge an invitational competition that includes work from all over Europe, from countries and firms big and small, and …

Eleanor Grosch

So many animals end up in the Eleanor Grosch universe—on the pillows, rock posters, and Keds where her designs appear, for instance—that a Dr. Dolittle comparison wouldn’t be off base. In fact, she named her Philadelphia studio, Pushmepullyou, after the …

Interviewing the Obsessives

Print: What it was like chronicling your week and then executing the results? Kate Bingaman: I used to document all of my purchases, by taking a photo and keeping the receipt. I did this for 28 months. I stopped in …

Hooked on Comics

“I like to make something with my own hands,” explains Françoise Mouly. The art director for The New Yorker stands at a light table in her home studio in downtown New York City, fingers covered in glue. She’s pasting in …

Matthew Diffee

Print: Was there a lot of momentum and positive reaction from the first book that prompted your collecting the material for the second? Matthew Diffee: Well, yes, there was, and thanks for asking. The publisher was pleased by the sales …

Golden Age

— For eight decades now, The New Yorker has been the centerpiece of a treasured ritual. The arrival of each weekly issue prompts a personal, individual rite: Some readers savor the gleam of the cover illustration, while others proceed immediately …

Everybody Loves Rea Irvin

All typefaces have personalities, but few say “dandy” as confidently as the one on the cover of The New Yorker. Inside, it does a modest dance as display type in black, red, or blue, and heralds the magazine’s website. You …

Primary Colors

  This was The New Republic’s year in lights, some of them hotter than others. Last year, TNR promoted the energetic young editor Franklin Foer, then 31, to its top post; circulation had been dropping, and many left-leaning subscribers had …