Author Archives: Emily Gordon

Editor’s Letter: February 2010

[Ed. note: This article originally appears as an introduction to the February 2010 issue, celebrating the 70th anniversary of Print.] — “Printing has been my heart throb since 1886 when, with the help of a partner my age, I began picking up type from the sweeping outside the back doors of the town’s two...

Zigmunds Lapsa

  Zigmunds Lapsa isn’t easily fazed. He grew up in Riga, the capital of Latvia, which he describes as a “country with 2.3 million people and 5.4 graphic designers at that time.” After two years in an unstimulating local design program, he decided that what he needed was more hands-on experience, a bit of...

Introduction to the 2007 European Design Annual

A Scotsman, a German, and a Swede walk into a design magazine office—you know how this one goes, don’t you? They judge an invitational competition that includes work from all over Europe, from countries and firms big and small, and shake it down till only the best are left standing. It’s a riot! Our...

Eleanor Grosch

So many animals end up in the Eleanor Grosch universe—on the pillows, rock posters, and Keds where her designs appear, for instance—that a Dr. Dolittle comparison wouldn’t be off base. In fact, she named her Philadelphia studio, Pushmepullyou, after the creature with a head at each end from the classic children’s book. Such an...

Primary Colors

  This was The New Republic’s year in lights, some of them hotter than others. Last year, TNR promoted the energetic young editor Franklin Foer, then 31, to its top post; circulation had been dropping, and many left-leaning subscribers had been rebelling against the magazine’s hawkish take on the Iraq war. More recently, the...

The Obsessives

The four artists whose intent expressions are pictured below are, in many ways, quite ordinary. They read, they eat toast, they buy fishing videos. Then they take it a big step further. Kate Bingaman created a dazzling online archive of years’ worth of purchases—and bills—all illustrated in minute detail. Designer Nicholas Felton charms the...

The 2.0 of the Town

Old magazines learn new tricks online.   Storied magazines The New Yorker (est. 1925) and Harper’s (1850) both launched major website redesigns this year, upping the ante among fellow classics like Scientific American (1845), The Atlantic (1857), and The Nation (1865) in the challenging game of branding such periodicals online. In this looking-glass world,...

Letter from Print’s new editor-in-chief

  The father of Print was a printer, William Edwin Rudge, who in 1940 founded the magazine to share technical savvy and inspirational examples with his journeyman colleagues in fine-press printing, printmaking, and book binding. As Print’s new editor in chief, I have the privilege of overseeing the magazine we have become nearly 70...

Ayaan Hirsi Ali

  Print: How do you see immigration conflicts reflected in Dutch visual culture?   Ayaan Hirsi Ali: The government tried to encourage people who are on welfare to go to the museums, and then discovered that no one was going—all the discounts were being used by the very rich. They started to take art...

Door Policy

— “Won’t you come to dinner?” read the posters pasted all over Amsterdam last October. Ramadan was coming to an end, and a Dutch organization called the Binding Together Foundation was promoting public iftar meals, in which Muslims and non-Muslims would break the fast together after sundown. The invitation presents a pictograph family: a...