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Uplifting Advertising

In the ’50s and ’60s, underwear ads, especially those for bras were visually limited. Take a closer look at this ad that broke ground by using a “live” model in a social context.

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Pharma Mexico is Surreal

Some of the most startling surrealist commercial art was (and is) produced for drug companies. View a few examples from the Mexican pharmaceutical industry.

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A Happy Book About Death

The Rainbow Box was a series of four books written by Joseph Pintauro (b.1930) and illustrated and designed by Norman Laliberté (b.1925). They were published as a boxed set (Harper & Row,1970).

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Soviet Literary Pulps

Take a look at Krasnaya Nov (The Red Virgin Land) was the first Soviet literary magazine, which was established in 1921, along with several other examples.

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The Interweb of Fine Faces

Jonathan Hoefler tells Steven Heller about Hoefler & Co’s latest latest font family, Surveyor — an interpretation of engraved map lettering that has been about 17 years in development — and his new web font service Cloud.typography, which draws content from the entire Hoefler & Co font library.

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Metzl’s Mad Men

The Advertising Conference by The Goswogii by Richard Henry Little and illustrated by Ervine Metzl was published in 1927. While there was a reprint of the original, the book is something of a mystery. Ervine Metzl is not.

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Show Us Your Stinkin’ Matches

I’ve written about matchbox labels in this space before (see here and here) because it’s incredible that there are so many, so varied and so small. The latter is key. How do you fit so much into such a tiny space?

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Do You Swear to Tell the Truth

You could imagine my surprise when on a sunny April day in 1969, I was served with a subpoena to appear before a State of New York grand jury. Actually it wasn’t me exactly, it was one of the three pseudonyms I used on the masthead of The New York Review of Sex (and Politics) also known by its partnership name, the New York Seed Company.