Design Books

How do visionary designers like Chip Kidd, Rodrigo Corral, and Barbara deWilde create such consistently memorable book jackets? A great book cover design showcases a designer’s ability to refine an idea to its essential visual expression, and Imprint surveys the best of jacket design in the genres of fiction, non-fiction, and experimental work, revealing the strategies top designers use to tell a story with images and type.

The Rand Book That Never Was

Paul Rand’s first monograph, “Thoughts on Design” (Wittenborn, 1947, reprinted by Chronicle Books), showcased and explained his “first stage” from when he launched his design and art directorial career in 1937 at Esquire/Coronet. He was occasionally involved in the editorial layout of Esquire fashion supplements but mostly designed promotion and a brilliant series of...

TDC’s 1957 Stellar Lineup

Ask any designer (well, any designer that I have spoken to) and they agree that the TDC annuals are the best. They are also among the precious few still publishing printed books. But when TDC started giving out awards for Typographic Design Excellence in 1954 the documentation was a pamphlet. According to TDC Carol...

Weimar 1919 in Amerika 2018

“In view of the current political and social situation,” writes Dr. Helmut Müller, Managing Director of the Bemeinnützige Kulturfonds in Frankfurt RheinMain, Germany, in the unforgettable, sadly retro-prophetic art history titled “Splendor and Misery in the Weimar Republic” (Hirmer), “in which the world seems to have lost its bearings, we should be particularly grateful...

Weekend Heller: Pensieri sul Design

As I lay on my hotel bed listening to the soothing tones of “My Way” by Sinatra and the “Godfather” theme emanating from the Piazza San Minerva in Rome, I have thoughts of Paul Rand. There are not too many books about or artifacts by Paul Rand in Italy, although his seminal Thoughts on...

Glaser’s Abstraction Covered

Steven Heller has habitually tried to put art and design into neat categories. Yet, as he gets older (maybe wiser), he realizes that Milton Glaser is right. The bucket-concept is not realistic. Art is about growth not limitation. And style is just a surface manifestation of many options available to us all.